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  #1 (permalink)  
Unread Feb 26th, 2005, 09:39 pm
Young
 
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Question Differences?

1. Could you tell me what is a maze and what is a labrynith?
And also the difference?
2. What is the "By the time" means?
Usually I can see that in the begining of the sentences.
3. What's the diffrences between "I know him","I know of him", "I know about him"?
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Unread Feb 27th, 2005, 12:48 am
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Default Maze/Labyrinth

A maze is the same thing as a labyrinth. They are synonyms, you can use either word you want. The word "labyrinth" was used in Greek mythology and has a more mysterious feel.

Meaning: a complex system of paths or tunnels in which it is easy to get lost.

Gardens are sometimes grown like a maze. A puzzle where you have to follow one pathway through a confusing pattern until the end can be called a maze.
You can also use "maze" or "labyrinth" to talk about something complicated. For example "The government is a labyrinth of rules".
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Unread Feb 27th, 2005, 01:08 am
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Default "by the time"

"By the time" expresses the idea that one event has been finished before another event.

You can use this expression to talk about the past or future, but remember to use the perfect forms.

Here are some examples.

Past
"By the time the girl arrived, it had started raining".
(First it started raining and later the girl arrived).

Future
"By the time she arrives, Max will have cleaned the house."
(First Max will clean the house. When the girl arrives she will see that Max has cleaned it).

For more information about the Future Perfect Tense, you can click here.

*I have to go out now. I will answer question #3 when I get back home.
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Unread Feb 27th, 2005, 01:09 am
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Default

Quote:
Quote Young
1. Could you tell me what is a maze and what is a labrynith?
And also the difference?
2. What is the "By the time" means?
Usually I can see that in the begining of the sentences.
3. What's the diffrences between "I know him","I know of him", "I know about him"?
#1 - Maze and labrynith are basically the same (as far as I know). Maze is more commonly used though.

#2 - By the time is a little difficult to explain. I'll use examples. A mother is going out, but her son must stay home and do his homework. She might say to him "Your homework must be finished by the time I get home!" or she could say "Your homework must be finished before I get home!" . She is telling him she wants him to finish his homework before she returns.

Another example: "I wanted to go to a movie at 4:00, but I was so late that, by the time I arrived, the movie had already started". I'm saying that when I finally arrived (for example 4:20) the movie was already playing.

#3. I know him means you have actually met the person. A friend or acquaintance

I know of him - You have never met this person, but you have heard of him, you know who his is but you do not know him personally.

I know about him - The meaning of this phrase might depend on the context or situation. It could mean the same as "I know of him", or it could mean "I know some information about him" or "I've heard some gossip about him".
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Unread Apr 25th, 2005, 06:49 pm
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A good example of the use of the word maze would be. When Promethius(Greek hero) went to look for the Minotour(half man half bull) he had to go through a maze. A complex path through a perilous place. He used string to find his way around.
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  #6 (permalink)  
Unread Jun 1st, 2005, 08:41 am
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1. a maze and a labyrinth are technically the same. A labyrinth usually refers to paths, corridors or road leading to somewhere that are very confusing/complicated. A maze is generally used for drawings and games. But again they are often used to mean the same thing. They both can be used as metaphors for confusing or complicated, but labyrinth seems much stronger than maze in this case.

These streets are like a maze.
Her signals are like a labyrinth.

as for the rest I agree

Last edited by mesmark : Jun 1st, 2005 at 08:46 am.
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