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Nightedge Apr 1st, 2015 03:14 am

how the language is used in the UK
 
When I was very young, I heard my teachers say that in the UK, dialects existed; and in these dialects 'he don't know' is correct and possible. When there's so much difference, recognised upon hearing, between 'he don't' and 'he doesn't', there are people in the UK who would still say 'he don't', which deviates a good deal from the standard language. Then is it correct to say that in modern standard English it is wrong to say 'in Sunday', but correct in dialects? I've googled but dialects seem to be so uninterested a subject that no authority has published things online. Are there any online resources we can use to understand how the language is really used by people in the UK or in England?

susan53 Apr 1st, 2015 12:38 pm

Re: how the language is used in the UK
 
I'd use "variety of English" rather than "dialect" in this case but that's just quibbling over terminology. The answer to your question is yes - lots of people might use "he don't" - for example in London where I come from. I've never heard "in Sunday" but wouldn't want to say that it doesn't exist in some variety somewhere or other.


I suspect that you didn't find much when you were searching Google because your search terms were too wide. You'll find a certain amount under wide searches like "varieties of English" or "English dialects", but try narrowing them to eg "London dialect" "Yorkshire English" "Scots dialects" "West Country English" "Norfolk dialect" - or whatever region you're interested in


If you're particularly interested in London, try "Cockney English" too, and also "Multicultural London English".

Nightedge Apr 2nd, 2015 02:29 am

Re: how the language is used in the UK
 
Thnak you.

susan53 Apr 3rd, 2015 03:01 am

Re: how the language is used in the UK
 
I've just been listening to the early morning news programme on BBC Radio 4 where there was a 3-4 minute interview with the boxer Kell Brook, who's from Sheffield. I noticed him use four expressions which would be considered non-standard, but which are common in a range of British varieties of English :
  • It don't make sense to me (instead of It doesn't...)
  • It were terrible (instead of It was...)
  • Them two... (instead of Those two...)
  • Meself I just want to... (instead of Myself...)

Nightedge Apr 3rd, 2015 03:47 am

Re: how the language is used in the UK
 
Quote:

Quote susan53 (Post 87360)
I've just been listening to the early morning news programme on BBC Radio 4 where there was a 3-4 minute interview with the boxer Kell Brook, who's from Sheffield. I noticed him use four expressions which would be considered non-standard, but which are common in a range of British varieties of English :
  • It don't make sense to me (instead of It doesn't...)
  • It were terrible (instead of It was...)
  • Them two... (instead of Those two...)
  • Meself I just want to... (instead of Myself...)

Thank you. But...um...do you mean in standard English we could say 'Myself I just want to...'? I thought we could only say 'I myself just want to...', the reflexive adverb being placed after the subject.

susan53 Apr 3rd, 2015 10:15 am

Re: how the language is used in the UK
 
No, both are fine. By fronting "myself" in this way you emphasise it. I can't remember exactly what Kell said, but it involved a contrast with what his opponent said - so the fronting "alerts" the listener to the change of focus. It was something like :

Khan wants to delay the fight - but meself, I just want to get into the ring.


It has the same meaning/effect as starting the clause with "personally" :
Khan wants to delay the fight - but personally, I just want to get into the ring.


Here's an example that I found in a novel on Google Books :

"Yes, very impressive" he agreed drily. "But then, it is designed to be. However, myself I prefer the less - shall we say tourist-inhabited places of the city."

Nightedge Apr 3rd, 2015 01:10 pm

Re: how the language is used in the UK
 
Thank you.


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