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emile Sep 18th, 2006 07:59 pm

SMS Games
 
err...continuing from another thread...:p

Have you used SMS games or activities in class? I've actually designed some, but I wonder how practical they are. (Text messages are cheap here, negligable really, but sometimes they don't go through instantly etc.)

Eric Sep 18th, 2006 08:10 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
never, but it sounds fun. what did you design?

mesmark Sep 19th, 2006 01:56 am

Re: SMS Games
 
SMS? :confused: what does that stand for?

simplyesl Sep 19th, 2006 05:15 am

Re: SMS Games
 
I play mobile games with my students after class. SMS - Short Message Service - texting, msging on your cell phone.

mesmark Sep 19th, 2006 07:47 am

Re: SMS Games
 
I've taken a few students to the computer lab and hopped on some chat boards, but I've never had them message people who were in the same room. It sounds like it would be cool if a few groups had a puzzle and they need information from the other groups to complete it...

emile Sep 20th, 2006 07:57 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
Quote:

SMS? what does that stand for?
That's what they call text messaging here in Malaysia. Is this term not widely used in the US and UK?

Quote:

never, but it sounds fun. what did you design?
Just simple things like word association and I-spy. There was once a story about a student in the UK who submitted her homework by SMS, using SMS language. You could turn this around and ask them to do just that. It's a great way to share haikus and so on.

Eric Sep 20th, 2006 08:00 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
Quote:

Quote emile
It's a great way to share haikus and so on.

oooooohhh, fun! :becky:

livinginkorea Sep 21st, 2006 01:23 am

Re: SMS Games
 
I read it more than I've actually heard it. I've seen it on loads of newspapers advertisments but it's more common to say text messages.

BTW it stands for "Short Message Service"

mesmark Sep 21st, 2006 02:50 am

Re: SMS Games
 
In Japan I've hear 'text messaging' but I left the states way before the age of SMS and don't know what is used over there.

clivehawkins Sep 21st, 2006 10:26 am

Re: SMS Games
 
If I say SMS when I go back to the UK people generally look at me strangely. It's not that easy to say 'texts' anyway. It just comes out like 'tex'. maybe it's just me.

Eric Sep 21st, 2006 06:21 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
i've heard sms on american tech podcasts and it took a few months to figure what they were talking about. everyone in korea says text. "text me!"

emile Sep 21st, 2006 07:41 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
Another one used in Malaysia and Singapore is 'handphone' instead of cellphone or mobile. What do people say in Korea and Japan?

Since we're on this topic, I often argue that the most widely used form of English is 'broken English'. And since the rules of the language follow usage and not vice versa, what does that mean for the future?

livinginkorea Sep 21st, 2006 08:36 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
Quote:

Quote clivehawkins
If I say SMS when I go back to the UK people generally look at me strangely. It's not that easy to say 'texts' anyway. It just comes out like 'tex'. maybe it's just me.

Ya doesn't it sound so strange! I always say "I'll send you a message later" or "I'm writing a message."

livinginkorea Sep 21st, 2006 08:40 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
Quote:

Quote emile
Another one used in Malaysia and Singapore is 'handphone' instead of cellphone or mobile. What do people say in Korea and Japan?

Since we're on this topic, I often argue that the most widely used form of English is 'broken English'. And since the rules of the language follow usage and not vice versa, what does that mean for the future?

Everybody says "handphone" here so I am always telling my students that it's Konglish (Korean and English mixed together).

To be honest handphone maybe is a lot more sense than cell phone or mobile phone. The funny thing is that some of the native teachers here call it "handphone" too :eek:

mesmark Sep 21st, 2006 11:06 pm

Re: SMS Games
 
I say the Japanese equivalent a lot to other native speakers, 'keitai.' I don't know why but stay anywhere long enough and I guess everyone starts code switching. Not using it sounds like resisting change.

Many foreigners also use the Japanese system for counting money. It costs 2 'man' which means 20,000 yen.


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