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-   -   What's the Difference??? (http://www.eslhq.com/forums/esl-forums/teaching-esl/whats-difference-68/)

Eric Jan 25th, 2005 04:46 am

What's the Difference???
 
Ever wonder what all those acronyms mean? Here you go:

TESOL: Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages
This acronym might be a substitute for TESL more than for TEFL. It is sometimes preferred over TESL because English can be a third, fourth or fifth, etc. language to a student.

TEFL: Teaching English as a Foreign Language
Teaching English as a Foreign Language is an industry catering for students studying English in non-English speaking countries (see EFL). It is often taught by both native English speakers and local experts, although native English speakers are generally considered preferable. Common qualifications for TEFL teachers include certificates and diplomas issued by UCLES (University of Cambridge Local Examinations Syndicate) and Trinity International Examinations Board of Trinity College, London.

TESL: Teaching English as a Second Language
The teaching of English in an environment where English is the predominant language, to someone whose first language is not English.

TEAL: Teaching English as an Additonal Language

TEIL: Teaching English as an International Language

TESP: Teaching English for Specific Purposes

ESOL: English for Speakers of Other Languages

EOP: English for Occupational Purposes

EAP: English for Academic Purposes

EFL: English as a Foreign Language
The study or learning of English in an environment where English is not already the predominant language, such as in a non English speaking country, by someone whose first language is not English.

ESL: English as a Second Language
The study or learning of English in an environment where English is the predominant language, by someone whose first language is not English.

Eric Jan 26th, 2005 12:38 am

Here are a few more:

CALL: Computer assisted language learning
Computer-assisted language learning (CALL) is an approach to language teaching and learning in which computer technology is used as an aid to the presentation, reinforcement and assessment of material to be learned, usually including a substantial interactive element.

EAL: English as an additional language
English as an additional language is used to refer to the learning of English by speakers of other languages. The term is commonly abbreviated to EAL. In British usage, this is also simply called English language teaching or ELT. EAL covers both ESL -- English as a second language, and EFL -- English as a foreign language.

SLA: Second language acquisition

TELL: Technology-enhanced language learning

ELT: English Language teaching

TOEFL: Test of English as Foreign Language
The Test Of English as a Foreign Language (or TOEFL, pronounced "toe-full", or sometimes just "toffle") evaluates the potential success of an individual to use and understand Standard American English at a college level. It is required for non-native applicants at many American and English speaking colleges and universities. The TOEFL is the product of the Educational Testing Service (ETS), which is contracted by the private, non-profit firm, the College Board to administer the test in institutions in the US; they also produce the SAT.

TOEIC: Test of English for International Communication
Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) is a measure of the ability of non-native English-speaking people to use English in everyday work activities. There are an estimated 3 million test takers per year.

TPR: Total Physical Response
Total Physical Response (TPR) is a method developed by James Asher, a professor of psychology at San Jose State University, California, USA, to aid learning foreign languages. The method relies on the assumption that when learning a second or additional language, that language is internalized through a process of codebreaking similar to first language development and that the process allows for a long period of listening and developing comprehension prior to production. Students respond to commands that require physical movement. TPR is an ESL/EAL behaviorist minded teacher's main tool.

The method was popularized by Blaine Ray, a Spanish teacher who saw how well interactive movements and stories helped his students learn. Since then, he has created the foundation of a method called Total Physical Response Storytelling (TPRS), which adds fun stories to Asher's methods.


TPRS: Total Physical Response Storytelling
Total Physical Response Storytelling (TPRS) is a method for teaching Spanish and French in schools. Mr. Blaine Ray created this method by combining a system called TPR with funny stories to help students apply the words learned. These stories are complemented with little books, identical in Spanish and French besides the language. Some include The Voyage of His Life and Almost Dead. Blaine Ray is a Spanish teacher whose main teaching idea is that whatever's best for the majority of the students is the best way to teach.

fishead soup Apr 20th, 2005 06:35 pm

TESL- Is more professional. Its easier to get a job in your home country. You teach mostly immigrants who really need to learn English.

TEFL- You are a kind of an entertainer and cultural ambassador. You spend your life living overseas going from one dodgy contract to another. Very little job security and high burnout rate.

susan53 Nov 14th, 2006 11:38 am

Re: What's the Difference???
 
There's also ELF - English as a Lingua Franca. I love it when people write about their ELF learners.

Oh - and TESOL can also mean Teaching English as a Second or Other Language.

emile Nov 14th, 2006 08:09 pm

Re: What's the Difference???
 
More acronyms to KIV (keep in view):

CELTA = Certificate in English Language Training

DELTA = Diploma in English Language Training

Cambridge Exams and tests:

FCE = First Certificate in English
BULATS= Business Language Testing Service, uses the ALTE levels (association of language testers of Europe) or CEF (common European framework) as standards

IELTS = International English language testing service

Maybe I need a diploma in encryption and codebreaking after all that!


Also, for Bond fans: SPECTRE = (SPecial Executive for Counter-intelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion)

emile Nov 14th, 2006 08:11 pm

Re: What's the Difference???
 
Quote:

TESL- Is more professional. Its easier to get a job in your home country. You teach mostly immigrants who really need to learn English.

TEFL- You are a kind of an entertainer and cultural ambassador. You spend your life living overseas going from one dodgy contract to another. Very little job security and high burnout rate.
ouch! our industry has such a great reputation!

Whistleblower Nov 14th, 2006 08:11 pm

Re: What's the Difference???
 
Ohh and you missed The Cambridge CELTA:
Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults.
Taken by over 10,000 people every year CELTA is by far the best known and most widely recognised qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL). It opens up a range of exciting opportunities to teach around the globe.

livinginkorea Nov 14th, 2006 08:20 pm

Re: What's the Difference???
 
Guess that this should be made a sticky for newbies to understand the jargon?


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