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  #1 (permalink)  
Unread May 20th, 2009, 09:20 pm
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Default Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

Hello

I would like to know if there is any difference between these places: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop. Do they mean the same in American & British English?

Thank you very much for your help!
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  #2 (permalink)  
Unread May 21st, 2009, 02:00 am
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Default Re: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

cafe and coffee shop are the same, as far as I know. cafe sounds a bit more posh.

A cafeteria is different. A caferteria has a food counter and is usually a line of food that the customer moves along and then selects what they want. This differs from a buffet in that the customer has to pay individually for each item they select (or there may be a limit to what they can select and how many, as with school cafeterias.) There's generally a large area for sitting and customers seat themselves.

I don't know of any differences between American and British usage. (I'm American, btw.)
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Unread May 21st, 2009, 02:29 am
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Default Re: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

Same for British English more or less, though Coffee Bar would be more likely than Coffee Shop (which to me sounds Japanese) I think, and those would be a lot posher than a cafe - especially without an accent (ie cafe rather than café). In Britain a cafe (pronounced caff or caffy) is often very downmarket and serves traditional English food. It's where for example lorry drivers might stop and get their eggs and bacon for breakfast (is this what you call a roadhouse in AmEng???) Often in fact called a transport cafe. Not to be confused with a café with the accent (pronounced caffay) which might be posher.

However, last time I was in the UK people didn't seem to be using any of the terms any more. They just said they were going to Starbucks
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  #4 (permalink)  
Unread May 21st, 2009, 03:10 am
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Default Re: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

In Australia, at least on the western side, we say cafe more than coffee shop or coffee bar; it's just easier I suppose.

The use of cafeteria is much the same as mentioned in the earlier post.
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Unread May 21st, 2009, 03:10 am
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Default Re: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

Quote:
Quote susan53 View Post
However, last time I was in the UK people didn't seem to be using any of the terms any more. They just said they were going to Starbucks
- Which one? ... the one on this side of the street or that side?

I was in the airport in Atlanta back in Nov. I could actually see two Starbucks from the spot where I was standing.


Quote:
Quote susan53 View Post
It's where for example lorry drivers might stop and get their eggs and bacon for breakfast
That's most likely called a 'diner' in AE.
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Unread May 21st, 2009, 03:14 am
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Default Re: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

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It's where for example lorry drivers might stop and get their eggs and bacon for breakfast (is this what you call a roadhouse in AmEng???) Often in fact called a transport cafe.
The term roadhouse is used in Australia, whereas I believe the Americans use truck stop. I could be wrong.
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Unread May 21st, 2009, 05:55 am
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Default Re: Cafe/Cafeteria/Coffee shop

Yes, I'd forgotten the word diner. Not used in the UK at all. So what's a roadhouse in the States? I'm sure I remember one in Twin Peaks ...
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