eslHQ Home
User Name Password
Lost Password? | Join eslHQ.com, it's FREE!
View today's posts
Search Extras Help   

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Unread Dec 12th, 2010, 04:32 am
Oden's Avatar
A Lifesaver for Cold Days
 
Join Date: Nov 16th, 2010
Location: Japan
Posts: 61
Oden has disabled reputation
Default [comma] One person who worked with him and drove the route regularly, praised him...

Bus driver shows motorists how to climb icy hill - Yahoo! News UK
Quote:
One person who worked with him and drove the route regularly, praised him for "a brilliant piece of driving."


Is this sentence better with the comma? "One person ... route regularly" is just the head of the sentence, including the subject.
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Unread Dec 12th, 2010, 05:19 am
Sue
 
Join Date: Oct 8th, 2006
Location: Milan
Posts: 1,362
susan53 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: [comma] One person who worked with him and drove the route regularly, praised him

No, the comma shouldn't be there. who worked .... regularly is a defining relative clause which forms part of the subject - and a subject and verb can never be separated by a comma.

Commas are used with non-defining relative clauses. Notice the difference between...

A. All of the passengers who wore life jackets were saved.
and
B. All of the passengers, who wore life jackets, were saved.

In (A) the relative clause defines "All of the passengers" - it tells us which passengers we're talking about - ie the ones who wore life jackets. The meaning is : All of the passengers who wore life jackets were saved whereas all of the passengers who didn't wear life jackets died.

In (B), however, the relative clause merely adds a bit of information about "All of the passengers" - All of the passengers were saved because they wore life jackets.

So non-defining clauses are separated from the main sentence by commas to show that they are not an integral part of it. They are frequent in written English but much rarer in the spoken language. Non-defining clauses, on the other hand, are common in both.

The "mistake" with the use of the comma often occurs, I think for two reasons :

a) people are used to seeing commas used with (non-defining) relative clauses in written English and therefore presume they should be used with all types.

b) in spoken English there might well be a pause between the end on the non-defining relative clause and the verb - especially if, as in your example, the NDRC was fairly long (yours is actually two NDRCs co-ordinated by and). So you might well say One person who worked with him and drove the route regularly (pause) praised him for "a brilliant piece of driving." Generally in English a pause in the sentence in spoken language can be conveyed by a comma in the written language - which leads people to make the mistake that you've pointed out here. It's an over-generalisation of a rule that doesn't actually apply in this case.
__________________
An ELT Notebook
The DELTA Course
Reply With Quote
  #3 (permalink)  
Unread Dec 12th, 2010, 09:47 am
Oden's Avatar
A Lifesaver for Cold Days
 
Join Date: Nov 16th, 2010
Location: Japan
Posts: 61
Oden has disabled reputation
Default Re: [comma] One person who worked with him and drove the route regularly, praised him



Thank you, Sue.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Find the Best TEFL, TESL, TESOL & CELTA Certification Courses - User Submitted Ratings & Reviews for Online, Distance & Abroad TEFL Courses. Over 3,500 reviews of 100+ TEFL schools!

Teach English in Thailand - Onsite and Combined TEFL certification courses in Phuket, Thailand.


Free ESL Flashcards




All times are GMT -5. The time now is 04:30 pm.

All materials from this website are for classroom-use only. Digital redistribution of materials, in part or in whole, is strictly forbidden!

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2