eslHQ Home
User Name Password
Lost Password? | Join eslHQ.com, it's FREE!
View today's posts
Search Extras Help   

Reply
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1 (permalink)  
Unread May 14th, 2010, 02:03 am
eslHQ Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Apr 24th, 2010
Posts: 59
thadajirajaras is on a distinguished road
Default What words are used instead "and"?

For example:

There are some advantages of mobile phones such as making comunication faster and easier, helping you in the emergency situation, as well as offering you many functions to use.

How about "as long as"?
Can I use "as long as"?
Reply With Quote
  #2 (permalink)  
Unread May 15th, 2010, 05:13 am
Sue
 
Join Date: Oct 8th, 2006
Location: Milan
Posts: 1,406
susan53 is on a distinguished road
Default Re: What words are used instead "and"?

No. as long as means on the condition that. So for example, a mother might say to a teenage son or daughter :

You can go to the party as long as you're home by 11.30.

Other expressions you could use to repalace and include :
a) in addition to - which is a subordinating conjunction like as well as and used in the same way : .... emergency situations, in addition to offering you ...
b) the sentence adverbials Moreover, In addition, and Furthermore. These are slightly more formal and should either be used in a separate sentence - ...emergency situations. Moreover, they ofer you ... - or co-ordinated with and : They make communication faster and easier, help you in emergency situations, and in addition, offer you many different functions.

However, by far the best way to write your sentence would, in this case, be simply by using "and".

There are several advantages of mobile phones, such as making comunication faster and easier, helping you in emergency situations, and offering you many different functions to use.

In general, one subordinating conjunction (here you already have such as) is enough in a sentence. A good rule to follow when writing, in order to make your writing clear and understandable, is to aim for sentence of about 25-30 words with no more than one subordinate clause and one co-ordinated clause. Expert writers can include more than this, of course, and still remain clear. But if you have any doubts, it's a useful rule to follow.

Re : emergency situations - remember the answer to a previous question you asked, about specific and general situations. The is only used when you are referring to one or more specific things. When you are speaking generally, either use the plural or a/an + singular. So here you could say in an emergency situation or in emergency situations.
__________________
An ELT Notebook
The DELTA Course
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

Similar Threads Replies
Electronic Dictionaries in ESL/EFL Learning 10
Pre-Primer Scrambled Words 0
Sight Words Bingo 0
My 100 Words Group 1 0
Bingo Words 601-800_01 0

Find the Best TEFL, TESL, TESOL & CELTA Certification Courses - User Submitted Ratings & Reviews for Online, Distance & Abroad TEFL Courses. Over 3,500 reviews of 100+ TEFL schools!

Teach English in Thailand - Onsite and Combined TEFL certification courses in Phuket, Thailand.


Free ESL Flashcards


Similar Threads Replies
Electronic Dictionaries in ESL/EFL Learning 10
Pre-Primer Scrambled Words 0
Sight Words Bingo 0
My 100 Words Group 1 0
Bingo Words 601-800_01 0


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 10:21 pm.

All materials from this website are for classroom-use only. Digital redistribution of materials, in part or in whole, is strictly forbidden!

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2