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  #1 (permalink)  
Unread Jan 16th, 2005, 11:24 pm
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Question Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

Hey,

I have a rather unusual job here in Daejeon, I'm an ESL teacher but my school doesn't care what I do. The guy who I replaced just played cards and gave the kids puzzle sheets to do. The director just wants the kids to have fun.

I'd like to develop a curriculum that achieves these points:
1. Is entertaining
2. Can be used on 3 levels
3. Requires no homework
4. ****Focuses on pronunciation and accents****


If anybody has any ideas or references to helpful sites I'd really appreciate it.

Thanks! Go EslHQ...this site is great!
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  #2 (permalink)  
Unread Jan 16th, 2005, 11:44 pm
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Default

I imagine its frustrating and unrewarding for you as a teacher if all you are expected to do is entertain some kids. You're not a clown.

I would suggest getting a good book and following their curriculum. I might be able to suggest some books (or a series of books) if you give a little more information about your students.

How old are they?
What is their level?
How often and for how long do you see them in a week.

Quote:
1. Is entertaining
I think most, but not all, books can be entertaining. You just need to find something you are interested in teaching as well.

Quote:
2. Can be used on 3 levels
Do you mean 1 book for three different levels? Or do you mean 1 book for 3 different classes at the same level?

Quote:
3. Requires no homework
4. ****Focuses on pronunciation and accents****
I think these 2 go hand in hand. If you are primarily focusing on pronunciation and accents, assigning homework will be difficult unless you know their parents speak quite fluently. Cassette tapes are a possibility.

Anyway, if you can give some more info about your class I, or someone else, might be able to point you in a more specific direction.

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  #3 (permalink)  
Unread Jan 17th, 2005, 12:01 am
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well, the classes are rewarding in a cultural kind of way. We do Mad-libs together, have tongue-twister contest and talk about interesting things, most of the kids are high level high-schoolers.

Anyway to be more specific:

1. the classes are middle school to high schoolers
2. I see each class once a week for 40 min
3. they are all pretty smart kids from what my week or so here has led me to believe.

Actually a pronunciation book would be wonderful. I know many of my favorite series like New Interchange and American Headway have sections on pronunciation but their hardly pronunciation specific books. Any suggestions?
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Unread Jan 17th, 2005, 02:02 am
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Default Pronunciation Book

I bought a book to supplement a beginner's adult grammar class that was called "Pronunciation through Interaction" or something like that.

Every chapter was maybe 2-4 pages (an hour would be plenty of time for each unit). The first few units started with simple sounds, emphasizing the difference between similar sounds, (for example, one unit might be practice hard c and g.) The next part of the book moved into intonation, linking sounds and other parts of pronunciation. Very useful practice.

Every unit had pair work or "find someone who" or survey-type activities, mostly fun but some a little boring. No homework would be possible. The cassette is essential because there is listening work in every unit. I don't know if there is a teacher's book which would enable you to simply read through the exercises and skip the tape...

Anyway, it might be what you're looking for. I'll get the exact name of the book when I go back to school to do the final slice of my triple split shift today!

And I agree, very frustrating to be treated like an entertainer at your job. Did your director ever ask you to tap dance or anything?
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Unread Jan 17th, 2005, 02:16 am
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Talking

Cool, Thanks I'll look for that book...it sounds like it's worth checking out.

But really folks...I LIKE MY JOB...I'm not a monkey boy, I just have creative control and no required teaching material, although there is plenty to choose from, just not on pronunciation Maybe I made it sound worse than it is. I actually chose this job knowing exactly what it entailed.

Thanks for all the imput.

-m
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Unread Jan 17th, 2005, 02:25 am
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Default oops wrong thread...ignore

Jan 22nd, 2005 to Jan 30th, 2005 08:00 am to 05:00 pm



Mt. Taebaeksan Snow Festival will be held from January 18, 2003 in Gangwon-do. The festival starts with a fantastic opening ceremony with performances, parade and snow sculpture exhibition. Followed are main events such as the Mt. Taebaeksan climbing competition, mini snow soccer game, snow sledding competition, and dance competition. Among them, the snowman festival and igloo cafe are especially popular. Snow sculptures with lighting effects at night makes the best background for the photos. Also, it will be an interesting experience to drink beer in a mug made of ice in the igloo cafe. ‘Ogung sledding’ is a must-do activity in which a traditional Korean sled is used to glide down a variety of sledding hills. Mt. Taebaeksan is one the ten best mountains in Korea and its spectacular snow covered scenery glittering like a silver kingdom, makes it the best venue for the snow festival.

Location: Mt. Taebaeksan Provincial Park, Taebaek-si, Gangwon-do
Inquiries: 033-550-2374 (Kor) /
Webpage:http://snow.taebaek.go.kr/

Last edited by me-cook-salami : Jan 17th, 2005 at 02:26 am. Reason: oops wrong thread...
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Unread Jan 17th, 2005, 04:07 am
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Default "Pronunciation Plus"

Quote:
Quote me-cook-salami
Cool, Thanks I'll look for that book...it sounds like it's worth checking out.

But really folks...I LIKE MY JOB...I'm not a monkey boy, I just have creative control and no required teaching material, although there is plenty to choose from, just not on pronunciation Maybe I made it sound worse than it is. I actually chose this job knowing exactly what it entailed.

Thanks for all the imput.

-m
Hey, sorry about getting carried away with how "bad" your situation was. I think something you said evoked horrific memories of my distant past...

The book I was talking about is called Pronunciation Plus: Practice Through Interaction published by Cambridge. The parts of the book include: vowels, consonants, consonant clusters, stress and rhythm, connected speech, intonation, sounds and grammar, pronouncing written words. Each part has 7 lessons. Easily finished under 40 minutes.

ISBN 0-521-57797-7

Last edited by little sage : Jan 17th, 2005 at 05:16 am. Reason: a little more info
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Unread Jan 26th, 2006, 10:23 am
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Default Using Music in class

Just an idea. I have been opening my class with music. Playing a piece of music that is slow enough that they could hear the words and with not a lot of instrumentation so they can hear clearly. I have used music from the 1970's : Paul Simon, Carol King, James Taylor, Stevie Wonder. We listen to it once after I explain what it's about then I hand out the words and we listen to it in parts. I stop the cd and explain the words they don't know or the meaning of idioms (there are so many). BUt I find its an entertaining way to start class. I teach adults so I would think that highschool students would identify even more with the music.

Good luck!
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Unread Jan 27th, 2006, 06:59 am
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Default Re: Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

I think music makes good listening practice too. I find it works quite well when some of the words are blanked out and students have to concentrate on hearing the missing words. I tell my students I consider them successful just for following the lyrics without filling in the blanks. So after one listening I let students dictate to me the missing words and I write them on the board, numbered. They usually manage as a class to produce most of the words.Then we explain anything that needs explaining and during the second listening they can sing along. As the school year unfolds I find that my students listening skills and their attitude towards listening improve. Especially with students in whose native tongue the duration of stressed and unstressed syllables is equal
listening to English, where the unstressed part of the words melts away, is very tough.
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Unread Feb 4th, 2006, 10:12 pm
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Default Re: Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

Tongue twisters can be fun. This site is good: http://international.ouc.bc.ca/pronunciation/ though it might be more suitable for adults.
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Unread Feb 5th, 2006, 07:26 am
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Default Re: Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

What did you mean again by "a book that can be used on 3 levels?"

As for pronounciation, if you're talking about phonics rules there are plenty of books but you can cover most of that yourself. You just need to get your rules down again and go in with the list to class. Search for phonics rules, curriculums, methodologies ... and you'll find plenty of resources available to you on the net.

Other than using phonics and breaking down each word into sounds, I find that repetition is the best teacher. If you can get them to talk and say the same things over and over again, you should see some improvement with increased fluency. Meaning, once they are past learning what to say, they can focus on getting it out quickly and with better pronounciation. Also, and this is my opinion, I think fluency is much more important than pronounciation. If they can get the whole thing out, a native speaker, or non-native for that matter, can usually make sense of the string even if a couple words are mispronounced.

They are listening and usually can tell they sound different from you. They just need to say the words over and over again before they can get it right.

The trick is getting them to say the same things over and over again.
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Unread Feb 8th, 2006, 08:05 am
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Default Re: Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

Quote:
Quote mesmark
The trick is getting them to say the same things over and over again.
I find this activity works really well for getting students to focus on their pronunciation until others can understand.
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  #13 (permalink)  
Unread Feb 11th, 2006, 11:00 am
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Default Re: Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

Try role playing and acting out skits using pronounciation exercises you are currently learning. I used this in my classes and the students loved it. The constantly requested it from class to class!

Nick Dauphinee
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  #14 (permalink)  
Unread Apr 6th, 2006, 07:44 pm
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Default Re: Looking for Pronunciation Currics..

The American Accent Training course is worth a try. It's got plenty of drills and goes into great detail. I wouldn't use it as a main resource, but it could be a valuable supplement.

With so much free time, why not produce some online learning material for the kids? It'll be fun, useful and you'll learn a lot.
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