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  #1 (permalink)  
Unread Jun 18th, 2006, 08:11 am
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Default IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

Hi, everybody!
I'm just wondering if you could help me for this topic. Is there a difference between American idioms and English idioms? I have a dictionary of English idioms. Does anybody know a book about everydaylife idioms ( well the ones we use all the time when we speak) . I mean with dialogues using these idioms? it's very hot today in Paris !!

Thanks for your answers
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Unread Jun 18th, 2006, 04:22 pm
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Default Re: IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

There are quite a few differences between American and British idioms and slang. Nothing comes to mind but you'll see a wide range.

Now, phrasal verbs and set phrasees tend to be more constant and they sometimes get labeled as idioms.

Maybe try searching google of differences between American and British idioms.
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Unread Jun 18th, 2006, 07:32 pm
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Default Re: IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

Maybe it will get cooler in Paris now that France couldn't beat South Korea...

But seriously, there are many differences in slang, but not too many differences in idioms, such as 'once in a blue moon'.

The problem with slang and idioms is that they come in and out of use. The dictionaries of idioms that you see seem to try their best to catalogue every single one, no matter how obscure. I've definitely had cases of students picking out and using idioms that went out of fashion twenty years ago. It's disheartening for them to be corrected because they thought they were doing a good thing.

For up-to-date idioms, (I remember once we discussed 'sup dawg?) I suggest that you look at sites like this:

http://www.macmillandictionary.com/2005/index.htm

Also a great source of idioms is basically any comedy, as they rely a lot on puns. You'll never teach your students all the idioms, so it's a good idea to teach them to recognise them and guess the meaning from context.
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Unread Jun 23rd, 2006, 09:22 am
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Default Re: IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

I guess " He's got bats in the belfry" is out of use today. Although I heard it in the movie " Journey to the center of the earth" starring James Mason . but it isn't a new film .
I was taught this idiom when I was young I must say. But I don't use it in conversation any more
Thank you Mark & Emile .I'm going to see Mcmillan's site.
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Unread Jun 25th, 2006, 07:40 pm
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Default Re: IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

"Bats in the belfry" is a bit old-fashioned, but I could imagine they may use it in a movie if it sounds funny in context. Also, I get the feeling that idioms are used more widely in movies than in real life. Anybody agree?
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Unread Jun 25th, 2006, 11:48 pm
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Default Re: IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

Quote:
Quote emile
"Bats in the belfry" is a bit old-fashioned, but I could imagine they may use it in a movie if it sounds funny in context. Also, I get the feeling that idioms are used more widely in movies than in real life. Anybody agree?
'Bats in the Belfry." ??? Does that mean the same as 'bats in the closet'?

I agree though that movies may have more idioms and catchy phrases than real life. They at least stand out more in those arenas. Maybe it's the whole scripted aspect and writers have the time to think and go back and change the language to make it more colorful.
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Unread Jun 27th, 2006, 07:25 am
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Default Re: IS there a difference between American and English idioms?

Have got bats in the belfry means : Be crazy or have strange ideas. So in the closet: does that mean the same?
In French we use a lot of idioms even in every day conversation . It makes us laugh.
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